Federal finances perilous but Morneau oblivious

Canada’s economy is weakening with storm clouds on the horizon while federal finances are woefully unprepared for a recession

Federal finances perilous but Morneau obliviousBy Jason Clemens, Jake Fuss and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute It’s hard to recall a time when Canada’s finances were so perilously close to rapidly deteriorating with seemingly little or no interest in Ottawa. Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau has been making the rounds since releasing the fall economic update last month, reassuring Canadians…

Federal finances on a razor’s edge

The federal government can’t continue to ignore the warning signs of a slowing economy. It should limit discretionary spending now

Federal finances on a razor’s edgeBy Tegan Hill and Jake Fuss The Fraser Institute The recently-released Economic and Fiscal Update demonstrates the federal government’s proclivity for marked increases in deficit-financed spending despite warning signs of a slowing economy. New borrowing and a larger deficit increase the risk to federal finances should a recession occur. The federal update pegs the deficit…

Federal government tax cuts miss the mark

We need smart tax cuts that improve incentives for workers, entrepreneurs and investors, along with a balanced budget

Federal government tax cuts miss the markBy Jason Clemens, Jake Fuss and Tegan Hill The Fraser Institute Finance Minister Bill Morneau recently confirmed the federal government’s intention to reduce personal income taxes for everyone except “higher-income earners.” With total taxes (federal, provincial and local) consuming 44.7 per cent of the average family’s income in 2019, it’s easy to see why Canadians…

Growing debt a clear and present danger to Canadian economy

Canada’s debt has grown faster than the economy. That dangerous pattern casts a shadow over the nation’s long-term financial health

Growing debt a clear and present danger to Canadian economyBy Alex Whalen and Jake Fuss The Fraser Institute Just before the holidays, the federal government released its fall economic update. It revealed that Canada’s federal debt-to-gross-domestic-product ratio increased in 2019, meaning Canada’s debt has grown faster than the economy. This is particularly important because the government chose the debt-to-GDP ratio to guide federal fiscal…

Keep federal government from messing with education

Canada's kindergarten-to-Grade 12 system flourishes because it's controlled by the provinces, which often show great innovation and creativity

Keep federal government from messing with educationBy Jason Clemens and Tegan Hill The Fraser Institute One of Canada’s great political strengths is that we’re a federalist country, meaning we have constituent provinces with significant powers that are distinguishable from the national government. This separation of powers, at least theoretically, allows the country to split the responsibility for different programs between the…

How politicians manipulate our decision making

The recent federal election offered us a lesson on how the manipulation of a narrative can have dramatic impact on how we think and behave

How politicians manipulate our decision makingLike many Canadians, I was amused and entertained (and appalled) by the recent Canadian election. But beyond the entertainment factor, there was a lesson here about human behaviour which we need to take to heart. The spate of scandals (#MeToo, political interference in the legal system, racism, lapses in ethical behaviour, the Norman Affair)  surrounding…

How will politics change in 2020 – and beyond?

From Donald Trump to Boris Johnson to Angela Merkel to Justin Trudeau – what to look forward to in the next year

How will politics change in 2020 – and beyond?It’s New Year’s Eve and the last day of the 2010s. The champagne is chilling, the food, party hats and noisemakers are ready, and friends and loved ones are nearby. What’s in store for 2020 when it comes to politics? We can certainly speculate. The U.S. presidential election will be held in November. The Democrats…

Alberta, Saskatchewan landlocked and abandoned

Blocking Prairie oil is not about the environment. And neither is it about safety. It's all about politics and control

Alberta, Saskatchewan landlocked and abandonedIn mocking response to those wishing to separate, some quip that Alberta would remain landlocked the day after it becomes independent.  With a more respectful tone, Alberta’s premier used similar words in his recent “fair deal for Alberta” speech. Those endorsing and those opposing Alberta’s separation from Canada would benefit from a clear statement of…

More money won’t necessarily solve health care problems

Instead of asking for more money and all the strings that come attached, the provinces should ask for more freedom to try new delivery models

More money won’t necessarily solve health care problemsBy Bacchus Barua and Ben Eisen The Fraser Institute Despite their differences, it seems Canada’s premiers are united in one thing: demanding more federal health-care dollars. But nobody talked about the price the premiers must pay for the money from Ottawa: the freedom to design and implement policies that could actually improve care. At the…

Alberta’s UCP needs the feds to get Trans Mountain done

It was actually the federal Liberals and Alberta’s previous NDP government that did the heavy lifting needed to get the project started

Alberta’s UCP needs the feds to get Trans Mountain doneIt was more than a little disingenuous for Alberta’s still newish UCP government to stand up and claim last week that its “perseverance” led to the start of construction of the long-delayed Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. “Perseverance has got us to this point,” clucked Alberta Energy Minister Sonya Savage. “When others were criticizing our energy…
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